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Building Industries at Sea: ‘Blue Growth’ and the New Maritime Economy

 

1en8vpf1wmmtujc36idaWe are happy to announce the publication of this new book – free access – Dr Sara Barrento contributed with two chapters on Aquaculture and Tourism. This is the result of the European project – MARIBE. Please download it, read it, share it, cite it!

 

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Developing  circular economy solutions using algae to reduce agricultural nitrate pollution and develop feed products

“Natural colours from the sea for a natural lifestyle” by Claudio Fuentes Grünewald, a finalist for the Art competition of Swansea University

Dr Claudio Fuentes Grünewald

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-40597299?SThisFB

Swansea Uni study finds UV-blocking algae a sunscreen_in BBC News

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-39923446#

UV protective algae could be used as a sustainable alternative to sunscreen, research at Swansea University has discovered.
There are hopes microalgae, which cannot be seen by the naked eye, could replace synthetic sunscreens.
The natural products, found in the sea, have a high absorbance of damaging sun rays.
Dr Carole Llewellyn, who has led the research, said algae sunscreen would be better for the environment.
“What we found is that algae have their own process of protecting themselves against the damaging ultra-violet rays,” said Dr Llewellyn, an associate professor in applied aquatic bioscience.
“We’re really interested in finding out how they do this and applying it to products we want to use.
“There’s increasing evidence that some of the synthetic sunscreens are quite harmful to the environment when they wash off in the sea.
“Many sunscreens are produced from petroleum sources and the industry is looking for something more sustainable.”

Invitation to the 7 UK algae conference in Swansea

Reuter News Article: UV-blocking algae could be nature’s own sunscreen

Reuters innovation news article on using algal sunscreens as an alternative to synthetic sunblock, sometimes blamed for adverse effects on human skin. Featuring Dr Carole Llewellyn and Dr Alla Silkina

http://www.reuters.com/assets/iframe/yovideo?videoId=371513735IMG_5362

New bioremediation paper published by Dr Alla Silkina

in Journal of Applied Phycology the paper with the title:

Bioremediation efficacy—comparison of nutrient removal from an anaerobic digest waste-based medium by an algal consortium before and after cryopreservation

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10811-017-1066-x

was recently published by  Dr Alla Silkina and colleagues under ACCOMPLISH project results.

The abstract:

An algal consortium was isolated from an integrated steelmaking site at TATA Steel Strip Products Ltd. in Port Talbot, UK, and its bioremediation capacity tested. Excellent “bioremediation” was observed when the mixed culture was “applied” to diluted effluent from an enhanced anaerobic digestion plant at Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water at Port Talbot, UK. After 5 days of cultivation in a 600-L photobioreactor, 99% of the total nitrogen (initial level, 4500 μmol L−1) and total phosphorus (initial level, 690.4 μmol L−1) were removed from the waste stream. The consortium was deposited in the Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP), an international depository authority for microalgal patents, as CCAP 293/1. This material has been successfully cryopreserved using a two-step cryopreservation protocol with dimethyl sulphoxide (5% v/v) used as a cryoprotectant. On recovery of samples after 3 months storage at −196 °C, the specific bioremediation activity of the revived consortium was tested. The capacity of the revived culture to bioremediate effluent was not significantly different (p < 0.05) from a non-cryopreserved control, with 99% of total nitrogen and phosphorus remediated by day 4. Although non-axenic algal cultures have previously been cryopreserved, this is the first report of the successful cryopreservation of mixed algal consortium, with validation of its ability to bioremediate after thawing comparing non-cryopreserved cultures with a revived post-thaw algal consortium. The study also highlights the need to ensure the long-term security and the requirement to validate the functionality of conserved inocula with biotechnological/bioremediation potential.

Collaborative visit to Mexico

During last week (13.02.17-17.02.17), part of Swansea University team of PhycoPigment project (Innovate Uk- Newton-CONACYT), Dr Claudio Fuentes-Grunewald  and Dr Bob Lovitt visited INECOL and Tecnológico de Monterrey facilities in Mexico. It was the first face to face meeting with our Mexican colleagues and it was a great opportunity to discuss latest results of our experiments. Swansea University Team in this project Robert Bob W Lovitt, Carole A Llewellyn, Alla Silkina, Darren Oatley-Radcliffe Tecnológico de Monterrey colleagues Saul García @Gibran Aleman Nava, INECOL team @Eugenia Olguínmexico-visit-tec-1

The 6th Congress of the International Society for Applied Phycology

La Cité  Nantes Events Center will host the 6th ISAP congress  from the 18th to 23rd of June 2017 at Nantes (Western France).

“Previous ISAP Congresses have seen the role of applied algal biotechnology and their potential developed in a commercial, remedial or regulatory context. In 2017 the scope of the 6th edition of ISAP congress is to appreciate the huge phycological biodiversity and the diversity of its biotechnological applications through the prism of a new and promising industrial sector in full development. The Congress will include speakers and posters presentations, exhibitors and for the first time a BtoB session to meet the right partners.”

The early bird registration is now opened and will close on the 15th of March.

Felloships are offered for students and young researchers by the Global Seaweed Network, ISAP and EABA (European Algae Biomass Association).

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