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Invitation to the 7 UK algae conference in Swansea

Reuter News Article: UV-blocking algae could be nature’s own sunscreen

Reuters innovation news article on using algal sunscreens as an alternative to synthetic sunblock, sometimes blamed for adverse effects on human skin. Featuring Dr Carole Llewellyn and Dr Alla Silkina

http://www.reuters.com/assets/iframe/yovideo?videoId=371513735IMG_5362

7th UK Algae Conference:“The best of both worlds- combining ideas from micro-and macro algae research”

AlgaeWales is organising the 7th UK Algae Conference, taking place at Swansea University on the  6th and 7th of July, 2017. Registration information can be found here.

We aim to link PhD students and Post-docs who research all types of algae. From micro to macroalgae there will be key note speakers, flash talks and poster presentations on a variety of topics within algal research as well as a tour of the facilities, networking, conference dinner and more.

Swansea University invites you to attend the 7th UK Algae Conference:“The best of both worlds- combining ideas from micro-and macro algae research” on the 6th and 7th of July, sponsored by Phyconet.

The event is open to all algae community members: associations, SMEs, stakeholders, academics, post-graduate students.

 

New bioremediation paper published by Dr Alla Silkina

in Journal of Applied Phycology the paper with the title:

Bioremediation efficacy—comparison of nutrient removal from an anaerobic digest waste-based medium by an algal consortium before and after cryopreservation

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10811-017-1066-x

was recently published by  Dr Alla Silkina and colleagues under ACCOMPLISH project results.

The abstract:

An algal consortium was isolated from an integrated steelmaking site at TATA Steel Strip Products Ltd. in Port Talbot, UK, and its bioremediation capacity tested. Excellent “bioremediation” was observed when the mixed culture was “applied” to diluted effluent from an enhanced anaerobic digestion plant at Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water at Port Talbot, UK. After 5 days of cultivation in a 600-L photobioreactor, 99% of the total nitrogen (initial level, 4500 μmol L−1) and total phosphorus (initial level, 690.4 μmol L−1) were removed from the waste stream. The consortium was deposited in the Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP), an international depository authority for microalgal patents, as CCAP 293/1. This material has been successfully cryopreserved using a two-step cryopreservation protocol with dimethyl sulphoxide (5% v/v) used as a cryoprotectant. On recovery of samples after 3 months storage at −196 °C, the specific bioremediation activity of the revived consortium was tested. The capacity of the revived culture to bioremediate effluent was not significantly different (p < 0.05) from a non-cryopreserved control, with 99% of total nitrogen and phosphorus remediated by day 4. Although non-axenic algal cultures have previously been cryopreserved, this is the first report of the successful cryopreservation of mixed algal consortium, with validation of its ability to bioremediate after thawing comparing non-cryopreserved cultures with a revived post-thaw algal consortium. The study also highlights the need to ensure the long-term security and the requirement to validate the functionality of conserved inocula with biotechnological/bioremediation potential.

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